2018 Snowshoe Retreats Open for Registration!

WINTER RETREAT REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

 

Sign up for a winter snowshoe retreat.  Due to popular demand, we have added a second winter retreat for 2018.  Our snowshoe retreats fill up quickly, so don’t delay! Because we are limited in the number of snowshoe retreats we can offer, and space is thus limited, we do give preference to people who have not been on a retreat, or have not been on a snowshoe retreat. 

 

Our 2018 winter  trips are:

March 16 – 18 (Friday – Sunday):  YMCA of the Rockies, Rocky Mountain National Park

 

April 9 – 11 (Monday – Wednesday):  THE 10th Mtn. Division Hut

 

At the bottom of this page, past the listings for these trips, is a registration form.  PLEASE check your calendars carefully when registering for these trips.  Be sure you don’t have a conflict. And be sure to select the trip and date that you want!

 

For 2018, Live By Living will offer eleven cancer survivor/caregiver retreats.  We are opening the registration for the 2 Winter trips now,  stay-tuned for the Summer & Fall retreats.  All trips are open to cancer survivors and their caregivers. (In our book, once you have been diagnosed with cancer, you are a “survivor.” “Caregiver” means a spouse, grown child, parent, or a good friend. Sorry, no dogs allowed on retreats.)

 

 

Trip costs: Zero!  But, you can pay it forward.

 

We are glad to announce that our 2018 retreats are FREE, thanks to our generous sponsors.

After you attend one of our retreats, we do ask that you “pay it forward” in some manner so that others can participate as well. To find out how you can do this, click here.

 

What trip should I go on?

This year, we have two types of  retreats on tap.  “Hut trips” are our traditional retreats, where we snowshoe to beautiful log cabins high in the Rockies.  Our other retreats are based at the YMCA Conference Center in Estes Park where we will spend our days hiking/snowshoeing in Rocky Mountain National Park.

There are two things you might want to consider when choosing your retreat:  your fitness level, and the type of accommodations that are offered.

 

On the fitness side, this year’s trips vary in difficulty.  In general, the YMCA retreats are easier than retreats to the huts, because they are at much lower elevation, and you just drive to the lodging instead of hiking in.  If you want to go on one of the hut trip retreats, we strongly encourage you to join us for at least one day hike so you and we can assess your level of fitness together.

 

 

On the accommodations side of things, while all of the trips are FABULOUS, there are some big differences between the trips to one of the huts, and the trips to the YMCA facility in Estes Park.  The accommodations at the huts are on the RUSTIC side: outhouses (or composting toilets), NO RUNNING WATER, AND NO ELECTRICITY. Also, most of the sleeping quarters are semi-communal (4-6 people per room). The YMCA cabin and lodge rooms are MODERN, with running water, electricity, full bathrooms, etc.  We book two people per room on the YMCA retreats.

 

On the other hand, the huts are really IN the wilderness, and there’s a lot more solitude on them than in busy Rocky Mountain National Park.  Finally, the huts are much higher than the YMCA conference center:  11,200 feet elevation vs. 8,500 feet.  If you have difficulty with high altitude, the YMCA is a better choice.  For more details on each type of trip, check out the Survivor Retreats page.

 

 

Rocky Mountain National Park Retreat, March 16 – 18 (Friday — Sunday)

This retreat is quite different than our traditional retreats that all go to the beautiful, rustic Tenth Mountain Division Hut Association cabins located above 11,000 feet.  Instead of snowshoeing to the cabin, we drive right to the front door!  Our base of operations is a beautiful, modern 6-bedroom cabin with all the amenities (electricity, running hot and cold water, showers, appliances, etc.) that is part of the YMCA Estes Park Conference Center.  We’ll spend our nights at this cabin and our days snowshoeing in nearby Rocky Mountain National Park.  This 2-night trip will give us two full days to snowshoe in one of America’s Crown Jewels.

 

 

On the Rocky Mountain National Park retreats, we meet Friday evening in time to get settled in our rooms and enjoy dinner together.  We spend the next two days snowshoeing in and near the Park, and head home Sunday afternoon. 

 

 

Tenth Mountain Division Hut Retreat, April 9 – 11 (Monday — Wednesday)

This year our winter snowshoe retreat will be to the 10th Mountain Division Hut, named in honor of the US Army’s mountaineering corps that trained here during World War II. It has great views of Homestake Peak, and great snowshoeing to Slide Lake. The trail is about 3.25 miles long, with about 1000 feet of elevation gain. 

 

 

The cabin has 2 bedrooms (one sleeps 4, the other 6), and a communal area with one double bed and 4 single beds. You can read more about the Tenth Mountain Hut here. We’ll meet around 9 on Monday, snowshoe in, spend 2 nights, and snowshoe out Wednesday morning.

 

 

 

HOW TO REGISTER

 

To sign up for a retreat, please fill out the form below, being careful to select the retreat you want. Click on the “submit form” button at the bottom. After you fill out the form and hit the “send” button, the form will go blank, and you should see a message to the left of the “send” button saying your form was sent successfully.

 

 

We will send you an automated email acknowledging receipt of your registration form. (If you do not receive an email within a day of submitting your form, please contact us at dsm@livebyliving.org.) If there is still space on the trip when we receive your registration form, we will send you a MEDICAL CLEARANCE FORM that you will need to fill out and return to us. YOUR DOCTOR WILL NEED TO SIGN THIS FORM. Please return the medical form within two weeks of receiving our email.

 

We keep a wait list for each trip that fills up. If you are on the wait list, DON’T GIVE UP! Keep the retreat dates open, if you can. Past experience has shown that people pretty far down on the wait list often get to go on the trips.